Star Names:

Caelum


Map of The Constellation of Caelum
Please hover over any star to get more information
Caelum, or the Chisel, is a small, inconspicuous constellation in the southern hemisphere, charted by French astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in the 18th century. He originally named it "les Burins" (sharp engraving tools) in his map of southern stars. This was subsequently translated into Latin and became Caela Sculptoris ("the sculptor's chisel") and later shortened to Caelum, or the "chisel."

The Caelum constellation occupies an area of 125 square degrees and does not contain any stars with known planets. It can be seen at latitudes between +40° and -90° and is best visible at 9 p.m. during the month of January. It is the eighth smallest constellation in the sky.

Caelum does not have any stars brighter than fourth magnitude. [1030] alpha Caeli, the brightest star in the constellation, has magnitude 4.45.

Another notable star is gamma Caeli, shared by two star systems. [1031] gamma-1 Caeli, is a binary with an orange K-type giant with magnitude +4.55 and a magnitude 8 companion. [1045] gamma-2 Caeli, is also a binary, with a yellow-white F-type giant with magnitude 6.32 and a fainter companion star.

Other interesting stars in Caelum include [1032] beta Caeli, a yellow-white dwarf, [1033] delta Caeli, a blue-white subgiant, nu Caeli, a yellow-white dwarf, and lambda Caeli, an orange giant.

Caelum belongs to the Lacaille family of constellations, along with Norma, Circinus, Telescopium, Microscopium, Sculptor, Fornax, Horologium, Octans, Mensa, Reticulum, Pictor and Antlia.

Constellations directly bordering Caelum are Columba, Dorado, Eridanus, Horologium, Lepus and Pictor.





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