Star Names:

Andromeda


Map of The Constellation of Andromeda
Please hover over any star to get more information
Andromeda is a constellation in the northern hemisphere, named after the ancient Greek tale of the princess Andromeda, the daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia, from the mythological kingdom Ethiopia. The constellation has also often been referred to as the “Chained Maiden.” In Greek mythology, Andromeda was chained to a rock and left to the monster Cetus to appease the gods before being rescued by Perseus. According to the myth, it was the goddess Athena who placed Andromeda’s image among the stars, between Perseus and Cassiopeia, with the constellation Pisces lying between her and the sea monster Cetus. The Andromeda constellation was also once called Persea (Perseus’ wife) or Cepheis (Cepheus’ daughter) in Latin. It was first catalogued by Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century CE. The story itself, however, dates back to the ancient civilizations of the Tigris-Euphrates region and the myth of Bel Marduk.

The Andromeda constellation occupies an area of 722 square degrees and contains four stars with known planets. It can be seen at latitudes between +90°and -40° and is best visible at 9 p.m. during the month of November.

Visually, the constellation is home to the Andromeda Galaxy, a large spiral galaxy which can be seen as a wide hazy patch on the right side of the Andromeda constellation. At a distance of 2.5 million light-years and an apparent magnitude of 4.4, the Andromeda Galaxy, also known as Messier 31, M31 or NGC 224, is one of the most distant objects visible to the naked eye. It is also the nearest spiral galaxy neighboring our own, the Milky Way.

The brightest star of the Andromeda constellation is [3], alpha Andromedae, identified in late Arabian astronomy as "Al Ras al Mar'ah al Musalsalah," or "the Head of the Woman in Chains." It is also known as Alpheratz or Sirrah, both names derived from the Arabic name "surrat al-faras," meaning “the navel of the horse.” Because of its location, immediately northeast of the Pegasus constellation, it is also known as delta Pegasi. Together with stars [6280], [6281] and [6279] (Markab, Algenib and Scheat, or alpha, gamma and beta Pegasi respectively), it forms the Great Square of Pegasus and was for a long time considered part of the Pegasus constellation.

Alpha Andromedae has overall apparent visual magnitude +2.06 and is theoretically visible at all latitudes north of 60°. When seen by the naked eye, it appears as a single star, but is in fact a binary system with two stars in close orbit. The brighter of the two is the brightest star known with a predominantly mercury-manganese composition. Along with [1879], beta Cassiopeiae (Caph), and [6281], gamma Pegasi (Algenib), alpha Andromedae is known as one of the "Three Guides," located almost exactly on the prime meridian of the heavens.

At an apparent visual magnitude that varies between +2.01 and +2.10, [4], beta Andromedae or Mirach, is the second brightest star in the Andromeda constellation. It is a red giant 200 light-years distant from the Earth. Its name derives from the Arabic word "mizar" ("the girdle"), referring to the star’s position at Andromeda’s left hip. It is also known as Cingulum or Ventrale.

The third brightest star is [5], gamma Andromedae, also known as Alamak or Almach ("the caracal"). To the naked eye, it appears as a single star but is really a quadruple star system with contrasting colours that lies approximately 350 light-years away from the Earth.

Other notable stars in the Andromeda constellation are [6], delta Andromedae, which is a triple star system, [12], upsilon Andromedae, which has a planetary system with three extrasolar planets, [15], iota Andromedae, a blue-white dwarf, and [30], xi Andromedae or Adhil ("the tail"), a binary star classified as an orange K-type giant.

Andromeda falls into the Perseus family of constellations, along with Cassiopeia, Cepheus, Perseus, Pegasus, Cetus, Auriga, Lacerta and Triangulum.

Constellations directly bordering Andromeda are Perseus, Cassiopeia, Lacerta, Pegasus, Pisces and Triangulum.


manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star manage star